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Posts Tagged ‘acceptance’

Water. Simple. Common.

We are surrounded by water in the lakes, the rivers, in the snow visible on lawns and along sidewalks and roads, in the water that comes rushing out of our faucets at the flick of wrist and in the. water covering more of the earth’s surface than land.

Indeed, there is enough water on the earth to cover the entire United States to a depth measured in miles and water makes up between 50-90% of the body weight of every living organism. Human anatomy textbooks tell us we can live longer without food than we can without water because water is in every cell of every organ in our bodies and our cells and organs cannot function without water and the same is true for all living organisms. We cannot grow food or grass without water, just ask the Texas and California farmers who have suffered from years long drought, the folks in Atlanta who watched their reservoirs dry up several years ago, or folks living in Flint, Michigan.

Of course, water has other uses. We clean our clothes, cars, and our dishes with water. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries water powered many of the industrial machines and ocean liners as well as being part of a national transportation network that included the Erie Canal.

Water is simple. It is common.

Yet, water becomes much more when it is poured into or baptismal font. For in this font our simple and common water is transformed into the waters of creation, the flood, the Red Sea, and the Jordan River.

When I hold an infant in my arms and I take water from here and splash it on the child, the water is transformed into the gift of God’s grace that comes to us without our having to do anything to earn it or deserve it. God just gives it to us freely, without any conditions being placed upon it because like the infant in my arms we simply receive this magnificent gift of God’s love. In this water borne love we are claimed by God to be one of God’s own beloved for the entirety of our lives as if saying, “You are God’s beloved child deserving love and respect just because you are you.”

When an adult stands next to the font and I take water and splash it on her head, the water is still transformed into the gift of God’s amazing love, but that person’s past is also washed away, it no longer exists, it is dead and it is buried in a tomb. She is liberated by God to live her life confident that all of God’s promises of an abundant, vibrant life are hers. She is a new creation and may begin writing her life story anew, writing it with the freshness and the joy that comes every time new life springs forth.

All of this happens on the day Jesus wades into the waters of the Jordan River, the waters John used to symbolically wash clean those who chose to turn their life around. Who chose to say, “I don’t want to live my life the way I have been living it. I want a different life. I want a new life with God and God’s people.” The same waters their ancestors crossed through to claim the land and life God promised them both in exodus and exile. A promise affirmed by God declaring, “I am your God and you are my people, my people who will show the rest of humanity what living in shalom looks like when lived fully.”

The people John baptized were assured of that same new life with God and God’s people because Jesus waded into the same water they had waded into and just as John baptized them, so too did John baptize Jesus. Not because Jesus needed to repent, rather because God chose to live in solidarity with all humanity by sharing the entirety of our lives with us. Experiencing all we experience.

That is what God was doing through Jesus from the moment of his birth to ordinary folks like Joseph and Mary in the everyday. common surroundings of a barn witnessed by ordinary folks like the shepherds and villagers of Bethlehem to the day Jesus wades in the water and is baptized.

Yet, God, also, came to be with us to write humanity’s life story anew. To move humanity away from the life of a world that hungers for more whether that is more profits, more body surgery, more cosmetics, more cars, more beer, more sex, more certitude, more security, more power, more oil, or more of whatever is the latest and greatest shiny, new thing, acquiring it and possessing it through coercion, hate, trickery, or game-rigging mechanisms without compassion or concern for others lower in the social hierarchy. You see, God comes to be with us to move humanity toward a righteous life, which is the point of Jesus saying “so we might fulfill all righteousness.” However, being righteous gets kind of a bad rap because the centuries long stereotype of a righteous person is being self-righteous, which deludes a person into thinking they are morally superior and, perhaps the arbiter of everyone else’s morality, as if they are themselves God and so end up in the idolatry of worshipping themselves. By the way, one of the essentials of reformed theology is sin.  Specifically, the sin the reformers were concerned about was idolatry. Indeed, this stereotype is so old that Christians in the second century told the joke about how when Jesus released everyone from hell, the devil wept, until Jesus said, “don’t worry when the self-righteous start dying, the place will be filled up again.”

 What is really meant biblically by righteous is the harmony between faith and acts of daily living that are aligned with the consistent and normative actions of God, which promote wholeness, well being and life for everyone. Being righteous means integrating into a whole, complete self our inner spiritual life with our outer acts of living, reflecting God’s intentions for all humans and human communities as well as the rest of creation.

The first chapter of this new story is written in Jesus’ birth when the world through the Magi’s willingness to follow God’s sign of a star came to a manger to acknowledge Jesus is Lord of life. The second chapter began being written when Jesus rose from the waters and the Spirit of God rested upon him and God declared, “This is my Son, the beloved with whom I am well pleased.” In this moment, we witness Jesus’ identity being clearly articulated publicly to everyone who was present on that day in the river, along the bank of the river and everyone who reads this gospel. But, that’s also when God claimed everyone who shares the waters of Christ, this water, to be God’s own beloved sons and daughters. Here is the moment when God says to all who share in this water, “You are God’s beloved child and you deserve love and respect because you are you, created in the image of God.” This is the moment our identity is clearly articulated publicly, in front of everyone present in the sanctuary of our baptism.

But, that isn’t all because in the aftermath of that moment Jesus goes out into the wilderness of temptation as the prelude to the daily living of who he is and what he is here to do as a righteous person that is spelled out in his actions and his words, most notably in Matthew chapters 5-7 or what we call the sermon on the mount. And, when Jesus calls disciples to “follow me” he is calling everyone whose identity is God’s beloved son or daughter to join in doing what he is doing because the second half of that identity piece is, “God will use me and you to change the world” by all of us being righteous persons joining in doing Missio Dei- the mission of God.

However, God won’t force us to be righteous persons, rather God invites and persuades us to choose to be righteous persons pursuing Missio-Dei. We need to actively choose to do this. It won’t happen by luck, by a series of fortuitous moments linked together, nor by us standing around complaining or whining about the state of the world or our lives. We must actively choose to do this. But here’s the thing to remember, every person, including all of us, has a life story they are writing, not only with words on paper, but through spoken words, actions, decisions, and all the experiences that come from our choices and we have the power to choose how our life story will turn out by choosing whether our inner spiritual life and our outer active life are an integrated whole.

Each one of us has the same power to choose today to trust God’s goodness, mercy, steadfast self-giving love and presence by serving God’s mission of restorative justice, of freeing those kept in bondage whether it is economic, lack of access to education, not having food sovereignty, lack of quality health care or tyrannical oppression, of valuing all life and seeking ways to nurture and promote an abundant life for all, of being the light that breaks through darkness, so other people may reach out for the light of God and in that light find the fullness and the life of shalom God desires for every person.

This will not guarantee that we will know exactly how our lives will go in each present moment because we are living our life as God’s beloved son or daughter joining God in changing the world day by day and writing our life story word by word, choice by choice and action by action and we may still experience pain, disease, sorrow \and suffering, but we will be able to live through those moments assured that God’s promises of life are for us and for our children and their children’s children. This confidence and strength comes to us in the simple, common water that Jesus transformed for all eternity into the grace that is always with us, all around us, bathing us in the life creating love of God.

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