Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘consequences’ Category

“And should I not be concerned about Nineveh, that great city, in which, there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and many animals?” God says to Jonah in one of best last lines of any book in the Bible.

Now, the question sounds like Cain’s question to God, “Well am I my brother’s keeper? Am I really supposed to be my brother’s powerful ally in living this life?” Which if one is faithful to God’s agenda can only be answered, “Of course.”

But, Jonah really wants to say, “No you’re not supposed to be concerned about them. They are the enemy! Not only do they not know their right hand from their left, but they don’t know right from wrong and they destroyed your own people in the Northern Kingdom Israel. So, you should just destroy them like you said you were going to do when you told me to go and tell them “Forty days and Nineveh will be destroyed.”

However, if Jonah did get to say that, we’d miss the most humorous book in the entire Bible. Jonah is, I think, an ancient near east satire where the hero says all the right things, but his actions contradict his words.

Remember, God calls Jonah to be a prophet and tells Jonah to go to Nineveh. So what does Jonah do ? He runs away in the opposite direction, boarding a ship bound for Tarshish. Then, he tries to hide from the creator of the universe down in the bottom of the boat, reminding me of people who deny something they’ve said even when it’s been recorded and played back for them. Pretty foolish, right? Then, a great catastrophic storm hits the ship and Jonah begs the crew to throw him overboard into the sea, so crew can save themselves, which they do. Of course, God sends a taxi to pick him up in the form of a great fish, who swallows Jonah. While in the belly of the great fish for three days and nights, Jonah prays thanksgiving for God hearing his cry of distress and bringing him safely out of the pit of Sheol and saving his life, of course he never did cry out for help from God, nor was his life ebbing away to death. This prayer uses all the right words, but lacks the conviction of faith. Eventually the great fish vomits Jonah onto the sandy shore just outside of Nineveh.

Now, Nineveh is the capital city of the Assyrians, who don’t believe in God and who were enemies of Israel because they were responsible for the destruction of the Northern Kingdom of Israel. They enslaved and scattered the people of the northern kingdom of Israel into the world where they were lost for centuries. Yet, despite Jonah’s unwillingness and disobedience, God still wants Jonah to deliver a message to the people of Nineveh that sounds like the certainty of judgment without the possibility of mercy.

So, Jonah proclaims, “Forty days more, and Nineveh shall be overthrown!” and he expects God will destroy Nineveh because Jonah can’t imagine the Ninevites repenting of their ways. Also, he doesn’t think the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob is the God of Nineveh and doesn’t think God’s blessing of love, compassion and mercy extends to outsiders, particularly not historic enemies.

Except, the hard truth for God’s co-workers is as my granddaughter Aubrey asserts when she is asked why she has done something, “I do what I do.” Well, God does what God does and we have absolutely no control over what God will do. This is as hard a lesson to learn as that referees and umpires aren’t going to change their calls no matter how much dirt we kick on their shoes, yell in their faces, yell from the sidelines, or scream at the television set. God does what God will do and doesn’t really care if we like it or not.

Jonah learns this the hard way when he proclaims his eight-word sermon and becomes the most successful prophet in the history of Israel when the Ninevites from King to peasant, including animals, go full on medieval repentance wearing sack cloth and ashes without any guarantee it will change anything, but just on the off chance that “God may relent and change his mind, so that we do not perish.” They rest their hope in God’s mercy and forgiveness.  What else could God do, except forgive them.

Jonah goes ballistic preferring death to watching this spectacle of grace. After all, no prophet speaking to the people Israel has ever had this much success calling the people of Israel to repent and turn back to God and God’s ways. Usually, they get stuff thrown at them or the king puts them down a well to drown  or they just ignored by the people. Israel never, ever repents this fully and immediately. It takes war and exile to get Israel to return to God. Jonah has never seen this spectacle of grace in Israel, so is angry at how responsive the people of Ninevah are to his eight-word sermon.

Naturally, God does play with Jonah a bit when he goes ballistic, according to Barbara Brown Taylor, when God creates a castor oil bush to grow up over Jonah’s head and provide shade for him as he sits hunkered down in his sulking pettiness, Naturally, Jonah likes the shade bush very much as much as he hated what happened in Nineveh, but it is short lived. God creates a worm to attack the bush and Jonah again threatens to die, as if this will ruin God’s day.”

And, because this a teachable moment, God asks Jonah, “Is it right for you to be angry about the bush?” This, of course, a trick question because if Jonah says no, it isn’t right, then he has no right to be angry about the mercy God shows the Ninevites. If he says yes, it is right for him to be angry, then God gets to compare what happened to the bush to what happens to a whole city full of people and maybe Jonah might get a glimmer of his petty self-righteous bookkeeping.

True to form Jonah does answer, “Yes, I get to be angry about the bush!” You see, Jonah like all of us bookkeepers loves the blessings of grace we receive, even if they come to us from way out of far-left field, like a package delivered to the wrong address. We love grace and forgiveness, we just don’t want those other people whom we know do not deserve grace and forgiveness to be blessed at all. We want to tally up the goodness points according to our calculations of who should get grace and who shouldn’t because. we want to be the distributors of grace according to our standards. But God’s grace doesn’t work that way. We don’t get to decide who gets grace and who doesn’t. It is all up to God. Period!

When God calls us to be co-workers of grace, calling people to change the direction of their lives, we are speaking God’s words, not ours. We are witnessing to God’s intentions that God loves all people and desires all people everywhere to have a life filled to the brim and overflowing with abundant peace. Not our petty bookkeeping way.

And, according to Mark, when Jesus says, “the time it is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near, repent, and believe the good news” he is saying God loves everyone and wants everyone to have an abundant life of peace and well being. It is also what Jesus will teach Simon, Andrew, James and John and all the other disciples to proclaim and teach, not just the first twelve, but all of us who claim to be followers of Christ.

Who knows maybe if we proclaim that good news, then teach why it is such good news, maybe we’ll be the most successful prophets and apostles of our day. Then, we too can join the party in Ninevah, whooping it up with all the other folks who don’t know their right hands from their left, but whose hope is in God’s mercy and love.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Jennifer Staple was a young woman working a summer job at an ophthalmology office in the summer of 2000, when she was exposed to the need for eye care education and screening programs in her local community. While others might have felt helpless to influence change, Jennifer began Unite For Sight in her college dorm room.

Unite for Sight has now become a global nonprofit organization addressing preventable blindness serving over 400,000 people in 25 countries.

Dr. Bernard Kouchner, Co-Founder of Medecins Sans Frontieres and Former Head of the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo, wrote of Jennifer’s work: “Over the centuries, most leaders have sought to bring about change through military intervention.  I’ve tried to mobilize people to undertake another strategy – humanitarian intervention.  Every citizen has the right to receive care and live with dignity,  national boundaries and political or financial circumstances cannot influence who receives that support.  Through her work to expand the fight against blindness around the globe, Jennifer Staple has intervened in some of the world’s poorest communities to ensure that their citizens, too, can lead healthy and productive lives.”

With a foreword by Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Our Time is Now: Young People Changing the World, tells the stories of 30 young leaders who took risks to try to change the lives of people around them.

Whether we speak about these young men and women as social entrepreneurs or social innovators, they and countless others like them are really extravagant risk takers. They are people who have a vision of what is possible then who go out to put their vision into action and create a new reality.

Edwin H. Friedman, who was a rabbi, family therapist, sailor and map collector, argued that the relationship between risk and reality is constitutive. His study of Columbus, da Gama, Magellan and Drake makes clear that it is the very risking of a new thought or a new spirit that brings about a new frame of reference, a new context of experience, a new way of living in the world — and thereby, changes reality. “Not one’s sense of reality,” Friedman insisted, “but reality itself.”

This is precisely where the parable of the master and three servants meets these young innovators to challenge all of us to become the extraordinary risk takers God calls us and gifts us to be. This parable speaks deftly about possibility, promise, risk, and a new way of seeing and living in the world.

First,  a master gives each of his servants a certain amount of talents. Now, it is important to realize that a talent is money. It is not a small amount of money; rather it is quite a large sum of money in the form of gold. One talent in the Ancient Near East is about one day laborer’s income for 15 years. Putting the sums into today’s monetary values, the servant who was given 5 talents was given about $1.5 million, the second $600,000, and the third $300,000. None of these are insignificant amounts of money.

While the master does entrust each of the servants with his property according to the abilities of each servant, we might think the one with the most talents has the most ability and the second the second most and so on. However, notice that all of the servants have abilities and all are entrusted with talents. All have responsibility and accountability for what is entrusted to them. All are included. Notice something else. There is not a valuation that states one of the servants is more important or more valued than the others. All are equally important and equally valued by the master. The only difference between them is the amount of responsibility and accountability each of them has based upon the talents entrusted to their care.

Also, the master apparently hasn’t told them what he wants them to do with these talents. There is nothing in the reading that tells us what the master wants the servants to do with the talents, nor is there any hint about his expectations for the care of the talents. Also, he didn’t give them any warnings about what might happen to them if they lost the talents given to them. As far as we know, the master simply entrusted his property to them then left. It is up to each servant to decide what to do with what is given to them.

The first two servants immediately go off and invest or put the money to work, proy in some high risk investment because they double the money entrusted to them. However, the third servant is not a risk taking sort of a guy, so he digs a hole and buries what is entrusted to him. He does the safe and secure thing. Indeed, burying the talents in the ground is commonly the way to keep treasure safe from thieves and marauding armies in the Ancient Near East. So, he does what is prudent. He isn’t going to put the talents entrusted to his care at risk.

After some time, the master comes home. He calls the three servants to come before him to find out what they did with the talents entrusted to them. The first two servants come in and say, “Master, look what we did! We took some high risks with your money! And, hey, we doubled it!”

Master says, “All right! You are good and faithful servants. Because you have been faithful in that responsibility, I’m going to give you a whole lot more responsibility to serve me and my will!” But, the third servant is questioned about putting his talent in a hole in the ground. “Why would you do that?” The master asks him.

“I was afraid of you,” he tells the master. “I know you’re a scheming, harsh, greedy person. You always get more from a business deal than is your proper due and I was afraid to take any risk with your property. I just wanted to give you back exactly what was entrusted to my care.”

“That’s not what I wanted you to do! I wanted you to do something with what I entrusted to your care! I would’ve been happy had you just plunked it into a savings account earning 3-4% interest. But, to do nothing with the talent I gave you is unacceptable!” the master shouts and takes away the $300,000 the third servant had and gave it to the first servant; then the master told the servants to throw Mr. Safe and Secure out into the darkness.

What is this master doing? Is he really the greedy, rapacious, harsh person the servant claims he is? Is he really someone who is vengeful, unfair, judgmental, and just waiting to banish a servant out into the darkness of death?

Or, did the third servant allow his own fear to paralyze him into doing nothing? Did his fear of taking a risk, so overwhelm him that he could only see a worst-case scenario? Did it never occur to him in his head or his heart there might have been a rich abundance present in the talent entrusted to him? Couldn’t he hear the master’s boisterous joy and delight in those servants who were willing to risk everything for his sake? Didn’t he realize the real risk taker was the master with his generosity and willingness to trust the servants in the first place?

Probably not. Because to me the one-talent man represents somebody who buried the richest treasure he had, the most alive part of himself, in the ground. By doing this he was never able to become the person he might have been. Also, I think the outer darkness the Master casts him into is not so much punishment, as it is the inevitable consequence of what it means to bury your life or hide yourself away from all the possibilities for blossoming into the wondrous fullness of the person who are created to be. It is as if you light a lamp then put a barrel over it.  You are alone and in the dark. Then comes the really harsh part of Jesus’ parable, “From him who has nothing, even what they will be taken away.” Those are hard words. But, Jesus’ point is that if you bury your life, instead of you growing, you shrink. You become less; you become diminished.  And, Jesus doesn’t call us to be less than we are, rather he is calling us to grow, to be strong, to be the good soil that produces an abundant harvest through discipleship.

But, Jesus warns us in this parable that discipleship does not promise a safe harbor. On the contrary, true disciples are called to take risks, to weigh anchor, to venture beyond the known and secure and be adventurers for God. The “talents” the master leaves with each of his three servants are the God-given gifts we all have received before we were born and are charged with using to the best of our abilities.

The master’s judgment of this servant and his actions reveal that if we wish to call ourselves faithful servants, we had better do more with the gifts we have been given than worry about their well-being. You see, God has never been one to play it safe. A God not interested in taking risks would never have created Adam in the first place. But God not only risked creation. God risked relationship — first with Noah, again with Abraham, eternally with David and the people of Israel. Finally, God even risked the divine self — becoming human in the incarnation and suffering an ignominious death on a cross, only to rise again in the joy of the resurrection.

If God risked everything in the person of Jesus Christ for the sake of our lives, doesn’t it seem likely that this same God might expect more than self-seeking, self-motivated, safety- conscious behavior from those who have been so wondrously saved.  The risk called for in today’s lesson is the willingness to open our lives to a power beyond our own. It is risk based on faithfulness — faith in yourself, faith in God’s ability to work through your life, faith in the power of a discipleship where the ones who came back with more than they started out with, will be entrusted with even more. As the parable says, they traded with their talents. Or as, Frederick Beuchner writes, ”They traded with their lives — a wonderful phrase. We were made to be life traders, because I have what you need, which is me, and you have what I need, which is you.”

The risks God calls us to take are for the sake of others, risking ourselves, not just our money or our status. You see other people should be the focus of our risk-taking as it was for Jennifer Staple and the other social innovators. Yet, relationships are the riskiest business around because they involve risking to love and serve, risking to be vulnerable, risking rejection and ridicule, and risking frustration and despair. These are the truly profound, extraordinary risks God wants us all to take, risking all for the promise of fulfillment.  Risking all for the new reality that is God’s Kingdom and doing it now!

Now, I know being Presbyterian and being risk takers aren’t always put together, but wouldn’t it be great to be known as those Bold Risk Taking Presbyterians, instead of God’s frozen chosen?

Read Full Post »

The pool of water was still. Only the humming sound of a honeybee across the pool in the tangle of wisteria and willow on the edge of the water and the murmuring wheeze of the old man’s breathing broke the silence.

“Been comin’ here a long time.” The old man whispered to the man sitting next to him. The old man looked up at the sky. It was clear and cobalt. The sun shone like a gold plate reflecting light. “Good day ta be here.” His companion nodded his head in agreement.

“Yes sir. A good day! You know, I think I just might be ready. I know by the look on your face you’re wondering’ ready for what?’ Well, I’ll tell ya. I’m ready for the train to take me home. Finally, I am ready for the train. It took me a long while, but I’m finally ready. I’ve spent my whole life trying to get ready, but I never felt really ready. When Myrna died, what…three years ago….I wasn’t ready.

I was foolin’ myself still. Myrna, she was ready. She was ready near her whole life. Not a better woman around. She lived the good news. She knew it and she lived it! She took care of folks when they were sick. Baked bread for the new wives arriving in town. Helped people when they were down and out. Had me build a house for those young Murphys when they first came here. Didn’t have a nickel, but sure did have babies. Myrna made me find him a job. She was wonderful. She made us go to church every Sunday.  She said, God gave us over a hundred hours a week, we could praise the Lord for at least two of ’em. Praise him, she said. That’s what we did, too. I..I never really understood her until now. Now, I know what she meant, when she said she was ready. Be ready at anytime. Nothin’ ta fear if you’re ready, she said. Now, I know. I’m ready!”

The old man saw the expression on the face of the man sitting next to him, “You have no idea what I’m talkin’ about do you?  Well, I don’t know how ta explain it, but let me try this way.

You see, a man and a woman stood on the platform at the train station. The day was beautiful with the deep blue sky, wispy clouds floatin’ overhead, and a soft, warm breeze ruffling their clothes and coolin’ the heat of the day down to a comfortable 75 degrees.

The man stepped close ta the woman and said, “Are you waiting for the train?”

“Yes, I am.” she said and inched away.

“So am I.” He said without moving. “Have you been waiting long?”

“Not very long,” she said and smiled at him.

“Me either. Do you know when the train will be here?”

“No,” she said, “I am not sure when it will be here.”

“Maybe I should go and ask the ticket seller.”

“If you want, you may, but I’m not worried about it. I know it will be here sooner or later.” She shrugged and walked away to sit down on one of the green painted benches under a wooden canopy.

The man shuffled off ta see when the train would be there. When he came back to the platform, the woman was still sitting on the bench under the canopy. He marched over ta the bench next to her and plopped down with a “humph” and unzipped his jacket.

“Well, the ticket seller was not very helpful. He had no idea when the train would be here. Said it was delayed somewhere. Might be a long time.” The man said.

“Oh. No matter,” said the woman. “It will be here. The time is not really important.” She closed her eyes and leaned back on the bench.

“You seem very calm about all of this.” She did not answer him or open her eyes. “Don’ t you want ta catch the train and be on time?”

“Of course. I already have my ticket and I cannot be late because the train has a schedule to keep, so I know it will arrive here when the time is right.”

“Why did you get your ticket so soon? There’s plenty of time ta git the ticket.” He looked around the near empty train station. “There’s not exactly a lot of people here.”

“Yes,” she sighed heavily, “but it is better to be prepared, so when the train comes one can board it immediately.”

“Why? I can’t imagine seating is a big problem.”

“The train does not stay in the station very long because it has many other stops to make along the way. If one is not ready to board it, one risks being left behind.”

The man frowned and half-turned away, “Poppycock! I can git my ticket and still make the train. Anyway, we’ve got plenty of time.” The man lay down on the bench and fell asleep. The woman fell asleep too.

The daylight faded into darkness. The lights of the canopy shown down on the two sleeping figures as other lights in the train station broke the darkness into circles of light. In the distance, a whistle blew. The shrill sound woke the woman. She heard the stationmaster shout, “Train is comin’. Train is comin’.” She shook her herself awake and stood up. She glanced at the man still sleeping. She reached down and shook the top of his shoulder.

“The train is coming into the station. You should get up.” She said as she shook him. The man woke with a start. He wiped his mouth and sat upright. “The train is coming.” She said as she walked to the edge of the platform.

“Uh. What?” The man said. “Oh. The train. The train is comin’.” He jumped up and ran to the woman. “How far out is it?”

“I do not know exactly, but I see a light down the tracks.” She said over her shoulder.

“Oh. Oh. Do I…”he glanced toward the station “Do I have time to get a ticket?” The woman shrugged. “How about you. Did you get an extra ticket? Can I get on board with you?”

“No. Everyone needs their own ticket, their own life. I only have one. You better go and get your own.”

“Yeah,” The man dashed off.

“And, you better hurry. The train is almost here.” She shouted after him.

The great diesel train whooshed into the station. The great silver and black compartments gleaming in the circles of light. The train stopped and a door opened in front of the woman. She smiled at the conductor, handed him her ticket, and boarded the train. As soon as she was inside and sitting comfortably in a compartment, the train roared and whooshed off.

The man came running out of the station house toward the train. “Wait! Wait! he shouted. The train roared down the tracks into the darkness. He stood at the edge of the platform. He crumbled his ticket in his hand and threw it down on the tracks. He turned round and walked back to the bench under the canopy.

Somewhere in the darkness an old gospel song played, “Are you ready? Are you ready?  Are you ready to sit by throne? For the Lord is comin’ to carry you home.”

Read Full Post »

“You are free to make whatever choice you want, but you are not free from the consequences of the choice,” writes an Anonymous author.

“ There will come a time when we will have to sit down to a banquet of our consequences,” writes Robert Louis Stevenson.

“My actions are my only true belongings. I cannot escape the consequences of my actions. My actions are the ground on which I stand,” writes Thich Nhat Hanh.

All three of these quotes affirm the same truth; we all make choices or decisions and the consequences of those choices or decisions are ours. We own them whether we like it or not. I imagine Harvey Weinstein, Donald Trump, and Bowe Bergdahl are discovering that very truth along with many other folks.

Now, sometimes we see those consequences clearly, but more often than not we fail to see all the consequences of our choices, those we intend and those we discover later as unintended consequences.

Certainly, the Hebrews in the wilderness failed to see all the consequences of their choice to abandon God in favor of worshiping a golden calf made out of their ornaments and jewelry. Yet, Moses knows that without God’s presence this “stiff-necked people” will have a hard time being the distinctive people God intends them to be. They will not be able to live into God’s way of living as the community of God’s people because they have not, yet, learned how their trust in God is connected to how they are to live in the world as the message of God’s grace and as a community where everyone belongs and is valued with dignity and respect.

This message of God’s grace invites everyone to come and join the community of God’s people, so they may see how life nurturing and life sustaining is this way of living in relationship with God and with each other. This is the reason God choose Abraham and Sarah in the first place and continued to choose this family as the instrument God will use to bless the world with wholeness and peace because God intends for everyone in the world to live together in this way of wholeness and peace.

Yet, the consequences of the Hebrews’ choices puts this relationship and way of living at risk because they failed to comprehend that faith in God has serious, but unavoidable consequences for daily life, from the most mundane issues to questions of life and death, particularly, as they live surrounded by cultures whose political, social and religious values are opposed to God’s way of being fully human.

Indeed, the Hebrews do not realize, at this point in their journey, that their identity as God’s people is part of an interwoven conversation about who God is and who they are because of their relationship with the God who creates life, saves life, and sustains life.

They do not realize that knowledge of God leads them to knowledge about themselves, individually and communally. Nor, do they realize that our ultimate obligation to God sets the boundaries and limits to all other obligations of our life, even recognizing we are defined by our relationship and connectedness to God, not by anything else.

The Hebrews’ problem was that they were like the group of alumni of a university who were all highly established in their careers and who got together to visit their old university professor. Conversation soon turned into complaints about stress in work and life. Offering his guests coffee, the professor went to the kitchen and returned with a large pot of coffee and an assortment of cups — porcelain, plastic, glass, crystal, some plain looking, some expensive, some exquisite — telling them to help themselves to the coffee.

When all the students had a cup of coffee in hand, the professor said: “If you noticed, all the nice-looking, expensive cups were taken up, leaving behind the plain and cheap ones. While it is normal for you to want only the best for yourselves, that is the source of your problems and stress.

Be assured that the cup itself adds no quality to the coffee. In most cases it is just more expensive and in some cases even hides what we drink. What all of you really wanted was coffee, not the cup, but you consciously went for the best cups. And then you began eyeing each other’s cups.

Now consider this: Life is the coffee; the jobs, money and position in society are the cups. They are just tools to hold and contain life, and the type of cup we have does not define, nor change the quality of the life we live. Sometimes, by concentrating only on the cup, we fail to enjoy the coffee God has provided us.” God brews the coffee, not the cups. So, enjoy your coffee!

Enjoying the coffee-enjoying life as “God’s people” and recognizing how the choice to trust God has serious, but unavoidable consequences for daily life is the difference between where the Israelites in wilderness were and where the Thessalonians were.

The Thessalonians had done something quite remarkable in the middle of living in the vibrant seaport trading and cultural center of a major Roman city; they made the choice to turn to God away from the idols everyone else worshipped and served. They turned to serve the true and living God. Paul’s letter celebrates this choice, which was so complete that they became the examples for other Christian congregations in Macedonia and Achaia to emulate. Their spirit- derived joy empowered them to maintain their faith, their love and their hope and become the living messages of the gospel-the embodiment of God’s good news in Christ, even as they struggled against persecution from their families and their neighbors.

The church at Thessalonica, of course, was not merely a model where faith, hope and love were held onto like a display in a museum just waiting for people to walk past and admire, rather the church was the place from which the message of faith, the testimony of hope and the power of love went forth into in the world every day. Yet, at the same time, it was also a safe place-a sanctuary- where people lacking faith, feeling hopeless, feeling unlovable could find the great blessings of grace and belonging.

In many ways, every church, including ours, should be such a sanctuary where people in need of the good news of Jesus Christ and the great blessings of the grace and belonging can find them. The first-century Christians got that point, by the way. They saw the church as a safe place to go to survive life’s storms and calamities. One of the first symbols that the early Christians used to represent the church was Noah’s ark, the vessel on which representatives of all living creatures found refuge during the catastrophe of the great flood. The ark was the place from which those surviving people and animals went forth to participate in God’s re-creation of life as a community of mutuality and interdependence.

In similar fashion, the early Christians considered the church as the place from which God’s living messages of grace went forth into the world bringing the story of God’s saving grace to a world in need of faith, love, and most importantly, hope. That’s the reason churches have stained-glass windows of Noah’s ark or the dove with an olive branch in its beak as well as why many sanctuaries were constructed in the shape of a boat and why the pulpit was set up high above like a crow’s nest from which the leaders could see the horizon, see the coming storms, the rocky shoals, or the land where the ship might anchor and be resupplied before continuing its journey.

And, while you’re pondering all of that, think about the importance of faith, love, and hope as blessings of God’s grace and the way we, who are the church bring those blessings to others.

        First, the church is the place where faith is offered without embarrassment. There is an old saying that Christianity is always only one generation away from extinction. Without the passing of the knowledge about Christ and the testimony of faith from parents to children, from elders to youth, from those convinced of the faith to those who have not yet heard it, Christianity might eventually either die out altogether or be reduced to a curious historical phenomenon. Now we could make that one-generation-away-from-extinction statement about many things in life — about technology, skills, scientific discoveries and so on — but with Christianity, what is passed on is not only knowledge, but also the assertion that the meaning of daily life and the path of life is found in Jesus Christ.

Some youth workers, Christian educators and pastors today are wondering, “Will our children have faith?” They observe that young people today are actually quite interested in God, Christ and Christianity, but they aren’t particularly turned on by institutional expressions of it. There is a phenomenon afoot among some in the younger generations who individually express their love for Jesus but not for the church of Jesus. Individual spirituality is a good thing, but it seldom is enough single-handedly to pass the faith to the next generation. It takes communities of Christ’s followers to do that in an intentional way realizing that faith is caught in an environment where people are living their trust in God, expressing their trust in God in worship, and maturing their trust in God through the intentional discipleship of life-long learning; especially the discipline of consistent Bible study and theological reflection all done within a community of faith.

Second, the church is a place where love is exercised without limits. Jesus told us to love our neighbor, and as we in the church understand that, he wasn’t talking about emotions but about behavior. He was talking about acting in ways that support the well being of others as opposed to exploiting other people. And when we really grasp that Jesus is calling us to love others as God loves us, calling us to compare the way we are treating our families, our neighbors, the guy who is annoying at work or the woman who is hard to get along with at the gym to the way God treats us and all other people, then we realize we come up short, but that doesn’t let us off the hook because it ought to cause us to dig deeper by realizing that love has no stopping point where we can say, “There, I’ve done my duty, and now I can forget about that person.”

        Third, the church is the place where hope is nourished without delusion. Certainly there are ample reasons to lose hope in life. In fact, it’s fairly easy to experience despair, because in the day-to-day flow of life it often seems so much more credible than hope. There’s generally plenty of evidence around us to encourage and engender despair, especially listening or reading to the news, tweets, or what happens to our neighbors and friends. But we in the church understand that hope is not rooted in what happens in the present moment. The hope the church shelters believes the kingdom of God is here, now and will come in fullness, without denying life’s sometimes tragic character or attempting to explain away tragedy as “God’s will.”

Hope is not some sort of wishful thinking that those of us with strong enough gumption can somehow muster up from some mythological place, like fantasyland. Rather, hope is the steadfast trust that when all else fails, when every other support gives way, our lives remain in God’s hands. The writer of Deuteronomy spoke of this hope when she said, “The eternal God is your refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms” (Deuteronomy 33:27, RSV). The image Deuteronomy suggests is of God’s arms creating a “floor” under us so that no matter how far down the weight and even the tragedy of life pushes us, we have a solid foundation on which to find our footing. Our task as the community of faith is to nourish this hope by being the strong advocate for hope in a community and a world too easily and too quickly grasping for the comfort of hopelessness.

Finally, faith, love and hope are the foundations and the fruit of a community of faith’s life as Paul certainly made clear in writing to the Corinthians, when he wrote at the end of the wonderful chapter about love, “And now faith, hope, and love abide.” They dwell together in a community of God’s people. That is, why he once again points to those three at the very beginning of his letter to the Thessalonians, “We continually remember before God, our Father, your work of faith and labor of love and steadfastness of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ.”  When we look for the blessings rising from the community of faith’s life together, these three rise to the surface: faith, love, and hope. They are God’s blessings for life given to us, so we might be living messages of grace blessing the lives of other folks.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: